May 28, 2014

Ottawa City Hall Hosts ‘Palestinian’ Exhibit Honoring Terrorists

Ottawa City Hall
Ottawa City Hall
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Toronto-based artist Rehab Nazzal created the exhibit featuring pictures of "lost artists, activists, writers and leaders." The pictures feature the face of Abu Iyad, a founder of the Black September terrorist organization responsible for the murders of 11 Israelis at the 1972 Munich Summer Olympics.

Dalal Mughrabi is also featured in the exhibit. Mughrabi orchestrated the 1978 Coastal Bus attack that killed 38 Israelis, including 13 children.

The mastermind of the Ma'alot school massacre, Khalil Nazzal, is also honored. The terrorist attack, which took place 40 years ago this month, resulted in the deaths of 22 children and 3 adults. The Israeli Embassy in Ottawa says that the exhibit's creator is a relative of Khalil Nazzal.

Numerous other terrorists are also featured. Abu Jihad, the former head of Fatah's military wing, led the 1975 Tel Aviv Savoy Hotel attack, killing eight innocent civilians, and the 1978 Coastal Bus Attack. He was also involved in the Munich Olympics massacre and the murder of American diplomats in the Sudan.

Israeli Ambassador Rafael Barak said that he is not demanding that the exhibit be taken down, but wants the Canadian public to understand that some of the artists and leaders are terrorists who have murdered innocent civilians.

1 comment:

  1. Calls are mounting for hardline Jewish settlers to be classified as terrorists after a spate of attacks on Palestinian property in the West Bank and Israel.

    Last week, the justice minister, Tzipi Livni, and the internal security minister, Yitzhak Aharonovitch, both argued that rightwing extremists should be classified as terrorists following attacks on soldiers at the hardline West Bank settlement of Yitzhar.

    And on Friday, the Israeli prize laureate author Amos Oz described the hardline Jewish settlers that carry out so-called "price tag" attacks on Palestinians as neo-Nazis.

    "Our neo-Nazi groups enjoy the support of numerous nationalist or even racist legislators, as well as rabbis who give them what is in my view pseudo-religious justification," the 75-year-old said at an event in Tel Aviv.
    It is not the first time that politicians and public figures in Israel have called for the branding of rightwing settlers as terrorists, but recent events have coalesced into something of a perfect storm.